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Different types of folk art of India

folk art of india

Introduction

India is a place that is known for rich social legacy. The works of art are an encapsulation of the assorted cultures in the nation. Every piece is extraordinary and one of a kind from the rest. Each Indian state has its special fine art, which is all excellent and amazing. Although, these works of art saw a bit decline in its popularity some time back, however, nowadays, on account of the rising enthusiasm in individuals for these magnificent art pieces, they have seen a spike in their popularity and demand. Below is the list of the famous folk art of India from different states that are prospering today because of their antiquities.

Madhubani

Madhubani painting, additionally known as Mithila Art (as it prospers in the Mithila locale of Bihar), is described by line drawings filled in by brilliant hues and differences or examples. This style of painting has been customarily done by the ladies of the district, however, today men are equally included to satisfy the need. These artistic creations are well known as a result of their inborn themes and utilization of splendid natural hues. These works of art are finished with mineral shades arranged by the specialists. These paintings were traditionally done on freshly plastered mud walls and floors of huts, but now they are also done on handmade paper, canvas and cloth.

folk art of india - madhubani
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Warli

Warli is an artistic expression indigenous to the ancestral locals of Thane and Nashik in Maharashtra, which includes divider canvases done by the people of Warli, Malkhar kholi, Dhodi, Kathodi and Kokana clans. These clans are occupants of the northern edges of Mumbai. Painted on the mud dividers of the nearby houses, this craftsmanship was first established in the mid-seventies. The Warli work of art portrays occurrences of public activity of the clans and furthermore they also show the most significant occasions like marriage, celebrations, and so forth in their art.

folk art of india
Source: Pinterest

Pata Chitra

The name Pattachitra has evolved from the Sanskrit words patta, meaning canvas, and chitra, meaning picture. Pata Chitra is a folk art abundantly followed in the states of Odisha and West Bengal. Pattachitra art form is known for its intricate details as well as mythological narratives and folktales inscribed in it. Paintings accept an affection of natural colours. These colours were extracted from spices, soot, earth, flowers and an array of added accustomed things. This folk art of India is believed to have originated as early as in the 12th century. It is one of the oldest and most popular living art forms.

folk art of india
Source: Pinterest

Gond Art

Gond comes from the Dravidian expression, Kond which means ‘the green mountain’. The Gondi association in Madhya Pradesh created these bold, vibrantly coloured paintings, depicting mainly flora and fauna. Gond paintings also take inspiration from myths and legends of India. Alternatively, they may also showcase images from the daily lives of the tribe. The colours used are from charcoal, cow dung, leaves and coloured soil. Due to scarcity of natural colors, today, these styles are imitated, but with acrylic paints.

folk art of india
Source: Pinterest

Kalamkari

“Kalam” in hindi means pen and “Kari” denotes work. This folk art is done with accomplished bamboo pens invented by the artists themselves. This distinct painting was developed in the celebrated places of Sri Kalahasti and Masulipatnam in Andhra Pradesh. Motifs drawn in this folk art, include flowers, peacock, paisleys and also divine characters from Ramayana and Mahabharata. Kalamakari was born out of an art of story-telling. In ancient times, people used to travel from village to village and tell stories; while some of them even drew it on a canvas, hence, Kalamkari was born.

folk art of india
Source: Pinterest

Rajasthani Miniature Painting

Originally from Persia and brought in by the Mughal invaders, this painting now possesses able access from the regions of Rajasthan. Rajasthani miniatures are found in Mewar (Udaipur), Kotah, Bundi, Jaipur and Kishangarh regions of Rajasthan. Drawn on paper, ivory, marbles, leather, walls, board tables, floors and covering this folk art uses different abstract features. The colours used for painting were made from minerals and vegetables, precious stones, as well as pure silver and gold. Nowadays, poster colors are used for this painting.

Source: Pinterest

Chittara

Chittara art is made by a tribal community called Deewaru in Shimoga and Uttar Kannada districts of Karnataka. The walls of the houses are covered in red mud and white paintings are made beautifully with rice adhesive and white mud on it. Chittara drawings are intricate patterns, that represent the auspicious ceremonies and rituals of life, symbolized in geometric patterns. It is draw on the walls, frames of doors, window frames and floors.

Source: Pinterest

Tanjore

From down South, Tanjore or Thanjavur paintings originated in 1600 AD, approved by the Nayakas of Thanjavur. You can recognize a Thanjavur painting by its use of gold foil, which glitters and lends the painting a surreal look. These console paintings on board planks characterize adherence to gods, goddesses, and saints. It borrows its styles from Maratha and Deccani art, as able-bodied as European styles.

Source: Pinterest

Rajput Painting- Rajputana

Rajput art forms flourished in the late 16th and early 17th century in the aristocratic courts of Rajputana. Scenes from Ramayana and Mahabharata are made in this art form. Colors used for these paintings were extracted from adored minerals like gold and silver, stones, and bulb sources. This was a diffuse action and would sometimes even take weeks.

Source: Pinterest

These colorful folk and affiliated art-forms of India, the artistic announcement of the flora, fauna, mythology, and ballad of the country describe the beauty of our age-old cultural heritage. 

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